Older adult woman exchanges laugh with middle school child in classroom.


Improving the lives of children,
youth and older adults through intergenerational collaboration,
public policies, and programs.

Press Kit
Need more information? Want to arrange an interview? Contact Alan King.

How the media identifies us:
  • advocacy group Generations United (Washington Post)
  • Washington, D.C.-based non-profit Generations United (USA TODAY)
  • Generations United, a D.C.-based nonprofit (Boston Globe)
  • Generations United, a national organization for intergenerational programs (Minnesota Star Tribune)
  • Generations United, a national nonprofit organization that promotes intergenerational strategies in public policy (Washington Post)
Grandfamilies:

Today, 7.8 million children live in grandfamilies, where grandparents or other relatives are the householders. Of these, 2.7 million grandparents are responsible for most of the basic needs of children living with them. Generations United runs the National Center on Grandfamilies

Intergenerational bonds among family members:

Generations United and the Alliance for Children and Families conducted a study of more than 2,000 adults, 18 and older, that found 61 percent of Americans with living parents, grandparents, children, grandchildren, great-grandparents, or great-grandchild reported giving extended family financial support for basic needs, e.g. housing, food, and transportation, amounting to an average of $3,800 annually. (See our 2014 report: Intergenerational Family Connections: The Relationships that Support a Strong America.)

Multigenerational Families:

More than 51.4 million Americans of all ages - or about one in six - live in multigenerational households, a more than 10 percent increase since the start of the Great Recession in 2007, according to our 2011 report, Family Matters: Multigenerational Families in a Volatile Economy. Some multigenerational families choose to live together; others form because of the widespread impact of the nation's economic downturn and uncertain recovery. (See our full report: Family Matters....)

Changing Demographics:

Americans of all generations are aware of the country’s changing age and race demographics and the vast majority is accepting of them, dispelling the “generational conflict narrative.” Our 2013 report, Out of Many, One: Uniting the Changing Face of America, which includes the results of a nationwide survey by Harris Interactive, reveals 72 percent of respondents believe that publically funded programs targeted at specific age groups such as K-12 education or Social Security aren’t burdensome responsibilities, but investments that benefit all generations. (See our executive summary: Out of Many, One….)

Hunger and Nutrition:

Food & Nutrition magazine named Generations United among its 7 Top Hunger Organizations for championing the cause of food for all in our 2012 report, Hunger and Nutrition: What's at Stake for Children, Families and Older Adults. Today, 1 in 5 children and 1 in 12 older adults is at risk of hunger in the U.S. Of those who sought and/or received assistance, nearly 74 percent turned to the government in some way for this assistance. Many sought support from additional sources as shown. Families with children were even more likely to have sought and/or received assistance. (See our Executive Summary: Hunger and Nutrition)

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